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GMAT Coordinate Geometry

by ejkiv


July 19, 2015


GMAT coordinate geometry is another topic that is not overly prevalent on the exam, but again worth preparing for so that you do not waste points that are attainable. So, let’s start with the basics and build into some of the concepts that will be tested on the GMAT. <a href="http://gmatprepster.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/GMAT-Coordinate-Geometry.png"></a> Above is the coordinate plane. The two lines, x and y, are axes of the coordinate plane and are perpendicular to each other intersec...

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GMAT Solids

by ejkiv


July 19, 2015


GMAT Solids are simply 3-dimensional shapes and are one area where people tend to struggle because they try to memorize a set of formulas for the two things you might have to calculate for solids: surface area and volume. However, this section does not have to be difficult. A small bit of logic can help you sift through all of the formulas. Really the only two solids that are tested on the GMAT, in terms of formulas, are rectangular solids (including cubes) and cylinders. You may come across ...

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GMAT Circles

by ejkiv


July 19, 2015


Circles are another favorite of the GMAT test writers. You might think that this should be a no brainer topic as there are only two formulas and a couple of terms that most of us learned about circles, but the integration of other geometry concepts is what makes gmat circle problems tough - and the few things you might not remember from high school. A term that you absolutely must know is π . The approximate value of π is 3.14. This may come into play in some calculations in DS problems, but...

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GMAT Polygons

by ejkiv


July 19, 2015


Although not a major topic on the GMAT, polygons are worth discussing as there are a few quick tips that can help on the exam as you run across some tough questions. Also, the only polygons that you are likely to come across are the following: If you see a polygon on the exam it will likely be a ‘regular’ polygon. This means that all of the sides and interior angles are equal to each other. This comes in handy as you are asked to calculate pieces of the figure. First, you will have to kno...

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GMAT Quadrilaterals

by ejkiv


July 19, 2015


There are several types of GMAT quadrilaterals, or four-sided figures, that you will need to know when taking the GMAT. We will look at the area perimeter and other properties of each figure individually. ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Trapezoid: A quadrilateral with one pair of parallel sides Area = ((b1+b2)/2)×h Perimeter = the sum of all sides (they can all be different lengths so there is no shortcut. __________________...

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GMAT Right Triangles

by ejkiv


July 19, 2015


GMAT Right triangles are everywhere on the exam. Make sure you spend some good time studying the portions of this chapter so that you can easily move between the rules, and you do not have to spend too much time recalling the relationships. There are two components to GMAT right triangles: Hypotenuse: The longest side, which is also opposite the right angle. Legs: The two sides that meet to form the right triangle. For the area of the right triangle the legs make up the base and height. Y...

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GMAT Triangles

by ejkiv


July 19, 2015


Triangles are everywhere on the GMAT. Even in problems where you do not see any gmat triangles, there are often ways to draw triangles in the diagram that aide you in solving the problem. It is paramount that you understand all of these rules and can comfortably move between them. There are three types of triangles that will be prevalent on the exam: Isosceles Triangle: A triangle that has two sides that are of equal length and two angles of equal measure (these are opposite the sides of eq...

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GMAT Lines and Angles

by ejkiv


July 19, 2015


GMAT Line (no different from regular lines): A geometrical object that is straight, infinitely long and infinitely thin. Segment: A line that has endpoints.   Parallel: Two lines or segments that never meet - designated as // - AB // CD Perpendicular: Two lines or segments the intersect to form a 90° angle. In drawings, this is represented with the drawing:  . Typically, these definitions will not be outright tested. Or, you will not see a question that asks you to define a parall...

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GMAT Geometry

by ejkiv


July 16, 2015


The very thought of geometry scares people. For most, it is a topic we covered for 1 year in high school and have not looked at it since. So, understandably, this is one of the more difficult topics for many people on the GMAT. However, it does not have to be. After getting past the initial learning curve of relearning/learning the terminology, the questions can really turn out to be quite simple. Your goal for this section is to gain comfort with the terms to be used in geometry questions ...

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